Genealogy research from home

By Brenna Cooper, Meade County Public Library  Staying #HealthyatHome is a great opportunity to do some genealogy research and learn where you came from, who your family is, and who you are. Many resources for your heritage discovery are available right from home and can be accessed through the Meade County Public Library (MCPL) website, meadereads.org.  Ancestry is one of the world’s largest history resources and operates a network of genealogical and historical records all in one place. Ancestry.com is accessible remotely through the Kentucky Virtual Library (KYVL). KYVL is composed of dozens of databases and is free to all Meade county residents. The link can be found under the ‘Reference and Research’ tab on the MCPL website, then under the ‘Databases’ tab on KYVL. You will need a user name and password to use Ancestry, both of which can be obtained by calling the MCPL.  Also on MCPL’s website are decades of older Meade county newspapers. Search for names and events, then sort by date or publication (some dates may be unavailable). There is a wealth of local history just a few clicks away. To see the newspapers, go to the ‘Genealogy’ tab on the MCPL website and click the ‘MC Messenger’ link.  Another helpful link under the ‘Genealogy’ tab is ‘Local Guides and Cemeteries’. This will take you to a website called Find a Grave where you can search for anyone and find a photograph of the grave in question. This is a user generated site, meaning that information is uploaded by other researchers. Not every grave will be listed, and some may not have the location or photograph, but it’ll help you get closer to finding many people.  All resources are free and available to all Meade county residents. If you have any questions or need assistance, you can call the Meade County Public Library at 270-422-2094 Mon.-Fri., 8 a .m.-3 p.m. and we’ll be happy to help.




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